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PROJECT TOPIC  : LABOUR-MANAGEMENT RELATIONS IN THE BANKING INDUSTRY A CASE STUDY OF GUARANTY TRUST BANK

PROJECT PROPOSAL

BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY
One consistent topic in the debate surrounding reform of corporate governance in recent years has been how to include “voices outside the company” in corporate decision-making and monitoring mechanisms. A series of recent revisions to the commercial law has legally enhanced the roles of external auditors and directors, and companies have been quickly adjusting in response. External auditors and directors, however, are selected at meetings of general shareholders, and the “voices outside the company” are essentially the voices of shareholders and investors.

Ensuring transparency in corporate management for those outside the company and safeguarding against tyrannical managers are certainly important. If the disclosure of information to shareholders and monitoring by shareholders are important, then disclosing information to employees, those most directly affected by management decisions, and ensuring that their “voices” are reflected in corporate management seem even more important. Are the “voices within the company” adequately reflected in corporate management? Are the voices of employees, whose professional lives depend on decisions made by management, being ignored? These are crucial questions, and their relevance is becoming more acute to employees who are facing a wave of severe corporate restructuring and reorganization.

Managers need a new mix of competencies to properly shape their board and develop their subordinates to meet 21st-century challenges. Shifting cultures, rapidly changing technology and other factors will require new patterns of management. The 21st-century managers will need greater awareness of diverse factors and new sets of competencies - characteristics that lead to success on the job - to help them make relevant, correct and timely decisions in the leadership of change and leadership of people.

An important factor in the management process is the relationship that the management has with individual employees. Previous researches have shown that successful interaction between managers and their employees are central to the overall functioning of a company (Graen and Uhl-Bien, 1995). High-quality management-labour relationships have been found to have impact on employee performance, organizational commitment, delegation, empowerment, and job satisfaction (Gerstner and Day 1997, Graen and Uhl Bien, 1995). The basic propoition of this study is that good management-labour relationship is vital to ensure the effective functional of any company.

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM
The interest in the influence of labour-management relations on organizational performance in general and employees’ performance in particular represents an alternative to the traditional focus on the management as the center of attention and power. The qualities of managers are obviously important, especially in teamwork. In particular, managers need the skills to engage employees in productive and satisfying mutual pursuits. However, this is a departure from the usual way of seeing managers qualities as possessions, rather than interpersonal links to others involved in shared activities.

Because not all managements wish to be participative, understanding and overcoming such reluctance to involve employees becomes important. Not least as a source of resistance is the problem of shared responsibility and who will be accountable. It is on this background that this research work aims to assess the extent to which labour-management relationship impacts on the morale and productivity of the employees.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES OF STUDY
The main aim of this study is to evaluate the labour-management relations in Guaranty Trust Bank.
The objectives of the study are stated as follows:
1. To highlight and justify the efficacy of cordial labour-management relations in the banking industry in Nigeria.
2. To evaluate the importance of labour-management in organizational building.
3. To investigate the effect of labour-management relations on the performance of the staff of Guaranty Trust Bank.
4. To determine whether participative labour-management relations inspires the staff of Guaranty Trust Bank?
5. To identify the problems associated with labour-management relationship in the business environment.

RESEARH QUESTIONS
The study would examine the following questions:
1. Do managers actually communicate with their employees?
2. What role does labour-management relations plays in organisational building?
3. To what extent does labour-management relations influence employees’ performance?
4. Do employees get inspired by the managerial pattern in the organisation?
5. What are the problems that are associated with labour-management relationship in the business environment?
6. What managerial style could be adopted to improve employees’ performance?

RESEARC HYPOTHESIS
Based on the theory of economics of information and co-operation explained above, the hypothesis to be tested in the course of this study is stated thus:
H0: That participative management style or pattern does not impact on workers’ motivation in an organisation.
H1: That participative management style or pattern impacts on workers’ motivation in an organisation.

BRIEF REVIEW OF RELEVANT LITERATURE
The cultural congruence proposition asserts that cultural forces affect the kind of leader behaviour that is accepted, enacted and effective within a collectivity. This proposition is supported by empirical evidence. House et al. (1997) conclude, from a review of empirical studies in cross-cultural leadership, that cultural differences account for a significant amount of variance in preferred managers’ behaviour as well as in actual managers’ behaviour.

Bolden and Kirk (2006) noted that despite the increasing popularity of leadership and the claim that enhanced leadership is paramount in achieving improved investment, productivity, service quality and delivery, investments in most organisations have not been encouraging. He argued that this has been as a result of the wrong notion that leadership is all about the leader.
Bolden and Kirk (2006) opined that managers could improve their practice and the quality of their relations with the employees by looking beyond inputs and outputs to interactions, traits and behaviours to ethics and values, the individual to the collective, and performance to purpose.

Fowler, et al. (2002) conducted an exploratory study of non-government development organizations in Kenya in the bid to finding the factors that could give rise to successful leadership of these organizations. It was found that the leaders must be more visionary in order to not only articulate powerfully to the outside world a sense of purpose and mission, but also to clarify to those that work with them the goals to which they should all strive. Motivation and training were also noted as requisites for the proper function of staffs and programmes.

JUSTIFICATION OF STUDY
The desperate nature of Nigerian entrepreneurs have over the years reflected on their emphasis on high profitability without due consideration of the well-being and motivation of the employees. This is readily noticed in the Nigerian banking sector where the employees’ private lives are compromised in the course of trying to meet the high demands and targets of the management. Young university graduates who are ignorant of what is happening in the sector often fall in this trap and the economy is not helping matters in any way. It’s high time this problem is visited and a lasting solution provided for it.

THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK
The linkages between corporate governance and labour management may be analysed in several directions. Or the interaction of corporate governance and labour management may influence firm strategy and performance, or be complementary to other institutions such as welfare state arrangements (Jackson and Vitols 2001).

The linkages between various dimensions of corporate governance and labour management have been conceived in different ways in economic theory. First, transaction cost models suggests that commitment by investors to specific firms supports stable long-term employment, investment in worker training, and co-operative industrial relations (Hall and Soskice 2001). These institutional complementarities support dynamic efficiency in lower-volume, higher-quality product markets requiring high skills.

Second, agency theory argues that employee rights increase the agency costs to diffuse shareholders (Jensen and Meckling 1979) and reinforce the advantages of direct control coming from relational finance, which are needed to counter-balance the strength of labour. Roe (1999) argues that, in countries like Germany, ‘diffuse owners may be unable to create a block-holding balance of power that stockholders would prefer as a counterweight to the employee block.’

Third, the economics of information and co-operation stress potential positive-sum aspects. For example, information and disclosure may enhance the prospect of voice for both investors and employees, thereby increasing the accountability of management (Hirschman 1972). This study would be based on the theory of economics of information and co-operation.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Primary data shall be used in the course of this research work. It shall be sourced via the survey method i.e the questionnaire designed by the researcher and distributed to the staff of Guaranty Trust Bank in some of its branches in Lagos. The researcher would then collect the filled questionnaire from the respondents in order to analyse the data collected with the appropriate statistical instruments(s).

The data, which will be collected from the questionnaire, will be analysed using the simple percentage method. The hypothesis testing shall be conducted using the chi-square test and goodness of fit. The simple percentages will be calculated by dividing the number of response for an option by the total number of response and then multiply by 100.


REFERENCES
Bolden, R. and Kirk, P. (2006) “From ‘Leaders’ to ‘Leadership’, Published in ‘Effective Executive”. ICFAI Publications, October.
Bolden, R. and Kirk, P. (2006) “African Leadership: Insights, Meanings, and Connotations”. A paper presented at Leadership and Management Studies in Sub-Sahara Africa 2006 Conference, Zanzibar, Tanzania, 26-28 June.
Fowler, A. Ng’ethe, N. and Owiti, J. (2002) “Determinants of Civic Leadership in Africa: An Exploratory Study of NGDOs in Kenya, A Search for Relevant Theory”. A paper prepared for the 5th Conference of the International Society for Third Sector Research Cape Town 7-10 July.
Graen, G. and Uhl-Bien, M. (1995) “Relationship-based approach to leadership: Development of leader-member exchange (LMX) theory of leadership over 25 years: Applying a multi-level multi-domain perspective”. Leadership Quarterly, Vol. 6, pp. 219 – 247.
Gerstner, C. and Day, D. (1997) “Meta-analytic rview of leader-member exchange theory: correlates and construct issues”. Journal of Applied Pyschology, Vol. 82, No. 6, pp. 827 – 844.
Hall, P. A. and Soskice, D. (2001) Varieties of Capitalism: The Institutional Foundations of Comparative Advantage. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
House, R. J. (1997) “The Social Scientific Study of Leadership”. Journal of Management, Vol. 23, No. 3, pp. 409-474.
Jackson, G. and Vitols, S. (2001) “Between Financial Commitment, Market Liquidity and Corporate Governance: Occupational Pensions in Britain, Germany, Japan and the USA”. In: Ebbinghaus, B. and Manow, P. (eds.) Comparing Welfare Capitalism. Social Policy and Political Economy in Europe, Japan and the USA. London: Routledge.
Jensen, M. C. and Meckling, W. H. (1979) “Rights and Production Functions: An Application to Labour-managed Firms and Codetermination”. Journal of Business, Vol. 52, pp. 469-506.
Roe, M. J. (1999) “Codetermination and German Securities Markets”. In: Blair, M. and Roe, M.J. (eds.) Employees and Corporate Governance. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution.

PROJECT PROPERTIES
Project Status
Available
Number of Chapters
5
Number of Pages
76
Number of Words
10,005
Number of References
24
Project Level
B.Sc.
Price
N10,000 - Ten Thousand Naira (Non-Negotiable)
Abstract, and Sample of Questionnaire are included
How to Pay for this Project . . . .CLICK HERE

Keywords: labour relations, labour relations training, labour relations process, labour relations issues, labour management relations act

 

 

 

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